Calls for proposals: Sustainable Crop Production Research to Improve Food Security

Spotted this announcement yesterday on eurekalert.org that will surely be of interest to readers of this blog. “International research initiative launched to improve food security for developing countries

“Researchers are being invited to submit proposals for the Sustainable Crop Production Research for International Development Initiative. The closing date for applications is 31 March 2011. For more information please see www.bbsrc.ac.uk/scprid

A new $32/M joint research initiative is to fund teams from the UK, India and developing countries to work on projects to “improve the sustainability of vital food crops”.

From the press release:

“The new initiative will place particular emphasis on improving the sustainable production of staple food crops across sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. These include cassava, maize, rice, sorghum and wheat. By placing significant emphasis on these crops the initiative partners expect to be able to improve food security and quality of life for the largest possible number of people. “

Full details of parameters for the outline proposal applications can be read by visiting the BBSRC (bioscience for the future) website. http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/scprid/ Deadline for applications is 31st March 2011.

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4 responses to “Calls for proposals: Sustainable Crop Production Research to Improve Food Security

  1. WOCSED organisation thank you for publishing this programme. WOCSED is working for women only, so we have been trying to see what we can do to solve the problem of food scarcityin our communities in Nigeria. Mrs Obi is the president of WOCSED.

  2. WOCSED organisation thank you for publishing this programme. WOCSED is working for women only, so we have been trying to see what we can do to solve the problem of food scarcity in our
    communities in Nigeria. Mrs Obi is the president of WOCSED

  3. Research in food production is really good when it carries through to placing a meal on the table. But there always seems to be a disconnect. The Great Lakes Cassava Initiative, GLCI is the greatest project I have interacted with in a long while. Even women are excited about it because those who have been part of it experience a level of economic empowerment and food security. The next level should have been expansion to all those communities vulnerable communities within the catchment area, and then value addition. Now we have farmers with so much cassava that even if they donated to all their neighbors, the cannot eat it and finish. They require the means to value-add while the others are still aspiring for access. But the project seems to have come to an end.

  4. thanks for the comment. Unfortunately it’s not the first time I have read about good research being criticised because it lacks appropriate/integrated market development.

    I don’t know if you are aware of the changes that have taken place recently in the CGIAR? This was partly the reasoning behind the new research programs of the CGIAR (CRPs) to extend programs vertically — so a development impact is tracked. There are some materials available on the Consortium of CGIAR centres website in case you are interested. http://consortium.cgxchange.org/

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