Tag Archives: cas-ip-msa09

Communication tools for communities of practice events

http://www.cas-ip.org/public/uploads/2009/05/communications-skills-from-2009-npi-workshop-in-mombasa.pdf

The above link will take you to a document that was produced by Bev Trayner after she facilitated a workshop as part of the NPI in January of this year

The document is called “Learning activities: some communication tools for communities of practice events”.  Almost all of the members of the NPI have talked about the importance of raising awareness of IP issues within their institutions.  These tools and methods can be employed to achieve just that.  IP management isn’t an easy concept to communicate so creativity in ones approach can certainly help transfer the message more effectively.

How do IPRs and IP help public agricultural research in developing/emerging economy countries?

the National Partners Initiative
I’m continuing to blog from the the National Partners Initiative workshop being held in Mombasa.  I have been talking to the participants this week about where they see IP making a positive contribution in agricultural research in their countries.  I wanted to take this opportunity to share on this blog some of the comments:

From Indonesia:
“IP rights encourage scientists to develop their career & innovation.  Patents and copyright provided incentives at a national research centre’ ”

From Malaysia:
“IP helps the potential to commercialize an R&D project.  It adds value to the R&D and indicates a certain quality standard”

From China:
“IP improved income into local breeding institute”

From Tanzania
“breeders work hard to find their own varieties – it gives breeder incentives and boosts their innovation when they have Plant Variety Protection”

From India:
“the grant of USPTO protection in the well-known cases of Tumeric and Basmati changed the face of IP in India.  Law makers were mobilised and sped up the implementation of TRIPS.  This has helped protect traditional knowledge and build livelihoods for producers in India.”

From Kenya:
“IP awareness has an impact on the attention paid to IP clauses in agreements.  It helps parties to understand roles and responsibilities and helps manage risk.  By formalising in this way partnerships are more effective because a mutual understanding is reached.”

Agricultural IP practitioners of the world unite!

http://www.cas-ip.org/?page_id=40
There is a slightly different format for the blog posts this week as I am attending a workshop in Mombasa meeting with a group of agricultural IP practitioners from all around the world; mainly from developing countries.  This is truly a unique group of individuals and if anyone knows of any similar group it would be great to hear from you!

We at CAS-IP have hoped this group of people would be able to support one another by sharing their experiences and ideas – and today we received confirmation that this growing community of practice/professional society has indeed been of great use to participants.  There is too much to blog now, but over dinner I asked my fellow diners what the most interesting thing they had learnt today was.  These were a couple of the replies:

Victoria Henson-Apollonio from CAS-IP said:

“I noted that there was a lot of expectation that the new DG of WIPO, Francis Gurry, would bring about real change on the development agenda.”

Beverly Trayner (the workshop facilitator for some of the sessions, and a community of practice expert) said:

“what really struck me was how important the international group is, and how people identify with that wider group, gain strength and empowerment from it”

What I had learnt today came from a great discussion about how to ensure research outputs are transferred to the end user (i.e the farmer).  The simple and plain comment that stuck most in my mind was a comment from a participant from Tanzania.  A comparison between the African and the US/European models of seed markets was made.  Within the context of a lack of a viable (private sector) seed market in Africa to bring research outputs to end users, it was pointed out that this isn’t possible in developed economies where agriculture enjoys huge subsidies – so why should it be expected in Africa?

Anyway, that is just a sample.  We were a small group at dinner tonight – it had been a long day –  but I plan to record some more insights over the next couple of days for a future blog post.  For now I am exhausted and going to bed before another full day of meetings tomorrow!